Measuring Customer Satisfaction

Managing Customer Satisfaction

What happens when you get on a plane and you’re happy? Or unhappy? Who do you tell? What do you do to communicate your experience? We all like to complain, how many bad experiences about flights do you hear vs. good? From a corporate perspective how do you react, how do you convert bad experiences to good ones before it’s too late?

This is what some of the new customer service executives on British Airways are trying to manage – capturing bad experiences and preventing them from escaping. The in-flight executive was measuring everything from the number of requested meals that couldn’t be served (I asked for chicken but got pork), through to seats requiring re-allocation and a random sampling of guest satisfaction.

Previously the CS execs had been using paper records, compiling & recording data for analysis afterward, today they use an app running on a tablet. The app allows them to not only rapidly dissect the data, but to make more informed decisions. It readily advises the team how they can compensate or make amends for service faults.

What if that could be taken just a little further? Providing the in-flight staff more information regarding the guest. Personal preferences, a past history of complaints (maybe they’re frequent complainers?), overall customer satisfaction metrics for the entire flight? Perhaps in seat surveying after the movie? Allowing you to capture a wider sample during the flight.

Do you remember receiving emails asking you how your stay or your flight was? How many of them have you responded to? Don’t worry, you’re not alone. Most people delete them. The percentage of responses is tiny. Worse, once you have the data, there’s not too much you can do with it. The guest has already escaped. Your opportunity to influence their experience for the better before they start telling the world has already passed.

Using the airline as an example, ask yourself what customer satisfaction metrics are you currently measuring? What could you measure if you had a little extra technology to help? Most importantly though, how can you use that to better understand and manage (not just measure) your customer experiences?

tweet a coffee campaign

Social Media Campaign Realities

You may have heard about the new data released by IBM, suggesting that social media barely drives 1% of e-commerce sales. It’s disheartening, but not necessarily an indication of the medium’s merit. Perhaps it’s an indication of the measurement system & social media campaign strategies being used at large?
Let’s take for example the recent Starbucks tweet-a-coffee campaign. The campaign embraces several key factors:

  1. Sharing; You can’t directly benefit, but your friends can, (you may benefit reciprocally) providing a strong incentive to share.
  2. Customer behaviour; Whilst there’s always a portion of people that buy just the one coffee and leave, most people buy other products too. The campaign doesn’t force cross & up-sells, but takes advantage of the broad understanding of client behaviour.
  3. Altruism; giving things away is perceived as a good thing to do, especially when it’s tied in to a cause. As Richard Branson writes “quote here on brand value”, you are your brand, and you need constant positive brand reinforcement.

Tweet A Coffee   Starbucks Coffee Company

 

It’s a social media based strategy, that positively benefits your branding and provides trackable (account creation & spend) results. Whilst I’m not privy to the success of the strategy, I’m confident more than a few people have been sending their friends coupons.

The “inherently social” or “designed to share” component is what makes the campaign successful on Social Media. If you have an app or a product that provides any type of interesting data, allow your users to share it! It makes your product more valuable to them, and is a great way for you to promote yourself.

Nobody’s interested in sharing a Starbucks app, or a Starbucks website, but they’re more than happy to share a $5 coupon. Ensure that whatever’s valuable to your users, is easy for them to share (preferably via a social medium).

Smiley Feedback

Awesome Social Recommendation

I’ve just started working with psd2html on a new web design project, and I noticed that they have a “rate our performance button”. What’s brilliant is that after your select a rating it asks you for a written comment. If your comment is good it asks you to tweet your comment. You don’t need to retype anything or do anything other than click the button again. I’m not surprised they regularly have great twitter reviews.

The ability to instantly convert positive feedback into a social recommendation is incredibly powerful, especially given that each recommendation is coming from an existing customer that’s already taken the time to write a positive comment. Most of the time it’s hard to find content to engage your clients, this technique has them socially (and positively) engaging with your brand – without you creating any new content.

At what point in your sales cycle are you collecting feedback? What are you doing with that feedback?
Are you showing off all your awesome customer reviews?